Art Deco Prints and Posters

Hot Press and Cold Press Papers

When it comes to paper, there are two main types: hot press and cold press. So what’s the difference? Hot press papers are generally smoother (sometimes much smoother) than cold press papers. Cold press paper is pressed with cold rollers or plates, which gives it a more textured finish. Which type of paper should you use for your artwork or photos? That depends on your needs and preferences. In this blog post, we will discuss the pros and cons of both hot press and cold press papers, so you can determine which one is right for you!

Difference Between Hot and Cold Pressed Paper

What is the difference between hot press and cold press papers?

Hot press papers are typically made of smooth, non-absorbent surfaces like clay-coated newsprint or wood pulp. This makes them ideal for use with inkjet or dye sublimation printers. Cold press papers, on the other hand, have a more textured surface. They are usually made of 100% cotton rag or watercolor paper and have a “toothy” feel that is perfect for absorbing pigment from pencils, charcoal, pastels, and paintbrushes.

So which type of paper should you use for your artwork or photos? If you’re looking for a smooth finish, hot press paper is the way to go. If you prefer a more textured look, cold press paper is the better choice.

Hot press paper is also less likely to buckle or warp when wet, making it the ideal choice for projects that require a lot of watercolor or ink. Cold press paper is more likely to buckle and warp when wet, so it’s not the best choice for those types of projects.

Both hot press and cold press papers have their pros and cons, so it really depends on your needs and preferences as to which one you should use. If you’re not sure, we recommend trying out both types of paper to see which one you like best!

Do professional artists prefer one type of paper over the other? While there are some who prefer hot press paper for its smoothness, cold press paper is generally the more popular choice among professional artists. This is because cold press paper provides a more forgiving surface for mistakes, and it also allows for more texture and depth in the final product.

Pros and cons of both hot press and cold press papers

Now that we’ve gone over the basics of each type of paper, let’s take a closer look at the pros and cons of hot press and cold press papers.

Hot Press Paper:

Pros:

  • Smooth surface is ideal for use with inkjet or dye sublimation printers.
  • Less likely to buckle or warp when wet.
  • Ideal for projects that require a lot of watercolor or ink.

Cons:

  • May be too smooth for some artists’ preferences.
  • More expensive than cold press paper.

Cold Press Paper:

Pros:

  • Textured surface is perfect for absorbing pigment from pencils, charcoal, pastels, and paintbrushes.
  • Forgiving surface for mistakes.
  • Allows for more texture and depth in the final product.
  • More popular choice among professional artists.

Cons:

  • More likely to buckle and warp when wet.
  • May be too textured for some artists’ preferences.

Which type of paper do professional artists prefer to work with most often, and why?

As we mentioned before, cold press paper is generally the more popular choice among professional artists. This is because cold press paper provides a more forgiving surface for mistakes, and it also allows for more texture and depth in the final product. Cold press paper is also less likely to buckle or warp when wet, making it the ideal choice for projects that require a lot of watercolor or ink. If you’re not sure which type of paper to use for your project, we recommend trying out both types of paper to see which one you like best!

Thanks for reading! We hope this blog post was helpful in determining the right type of paper for your needs.

The best Heat Press machine for beginners

Art Deco Prints and Posters is an American company selling from its offices in Paris, affordable, decorative and original French and European art deco prints, pochoirs, vintage posters, by Cappiello, Casandre, Colin, Broders, & Carlu, lighting, ceramics and vintage photography of Paris at Night, Flappers, Josephine Baker and the well known nude studio portraits by Walery, Rudomine and their contemporaries.

Artists represented in our collection are best known for their design illustrations for Art Deco luxury haute couture and satirical reviews like Gazette du Bon Ton, Journal des Dames et des Modes , Le Rire and La Vie Parisienne. They also created original 1920s Jazz Age costume designs for the French Music Hall Folies Bergere as well as book illustrations and collectible limited edition folios